Safer Internet Day / The Day We Fight Back

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By Lisa M. Rabey

Systems & Web Librarian

Today marks a special day on the Internet: It is the yearly Safer Internet Day, a day long event in which people from around the globe work together to provide a better Internet experience for all by sharing ways to “connect with respect” on being safe and having fun online.

It is also The Day We Fight Back, a worldwide protest against NSA’s mass surveillance protocol that is hot on the heels of SOPA and PIPA.

Both events are designed to bring awareness on privacy, cyberbullying, and security to name a few concerns. While you should always be safe and treat others with respect while you are online, it is always helpful to have a few guidelines. Below are recommendations, tip sheets, and organizational information on The Day We Fight Back and Safer Internet Day.

If you’re interested in learning more, the library has books / media on computer security, information technology – security measures, computer networks – security measures, computer crimes, data protection, and [Continue Reading]

Originally published at: Lisa @ GRCC

Banned Books Week: Censorship

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By Lisa M. Rabey
Systems & Web Librarian

Each year, hundreds of books are challenged across the U.S, and many of those challenges pull the books off the shelf for good. Nearly 80% of those challenges are never reported. In 2011, according to American Library Association, more than 300 books were removed from libraries for content objection ranging from violence, to nudity, to offensive language and even for something as benign as technical errors. Almost always, the challenge was initiated by a parent.

But why are the books challenged? Sometimes it can be for a religious disagreement, other times it can be for difference in political viewpoint. A recent, and rather publicized, case is Chicago Public Schools’ attempt to ban Persepolis (GRCC has volume 1 and 2 of Persepolis in the library), the award winning graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi of her childhood during the Iranian revolution, from the 7th grade classroom. According to the CPS spokesperson, it was found the content in Persepolis was not suitable for the 7th grade curriculum and as a compromise, had suggested of pulling the graphic novel from the classroom but leaving it in the library for students to read on their [Continue Reading]

Originally published at: Lisa @ GRCC